Emotional Fields: An exhibition by Carolina Mazzolari

Tristan Hoare is delighted to present Emotional Fields, an exhibition of large scale contemporary tapestries by Carolina Mazzolari. In her first UK solo exhibition (20 September – 25 October and opening tomorrow 19 of September), Mazzolari presents striking hand-embroidered textiles inspired by Kurt Lewin’s space diagrams and Carl Gustav Jung’s theories on the collective unconscious.
These ideas are manifested as woven emotional maps, guiding the viewer through abstract states which are described in cotton, silk and wool thread embroidered onto an unprimed linen with her distinctive herringbone stitch technique. In each map there is a sense of intimacy as the artist has physically interacted with the fabrics
over many hundreds of hours. The resulting maps are reminiscent of mandalas where love, hesitation, loss, grief and struggle are described in personal and universal
language, suggesting a deeper human pattern.
The exhibition is divided into three rooms, beginning with a video installation Emosphere in Room 1. This work showcases silver pigment reacting with spirit, resembling the mind’s behaviour during an emotional reaction.
An emotion is difficult to define, it is both chemical and spiritual, tangible and invisible; so, this first room acts an introduction to the themes contained in Mazzolari’s textiles and explored in the exhibition.
Room 2 contains tapestries rich in symbolism, that portray archetypal figures and motifs, all of which embody universal traits and emotions inherent throughout humanity. In the final room (3), Mazzolari shifts from universal symbols to more personal interpretations. These abstract maps are the result of Mazzolari’s quest to represent elusive states of being – resulting in Emotional Fields.
For this exhibition, which runs throughout Frieze London 2019, the artist worked closely with Fine Cell Work, a non profit organisation collaborating with UK prisoners and ex-prisoners.

CAROLINA MAZZOLARI started as one of the creative founders of PIGmag in 1999. She trained as a textile artist at Chelsea College of Art, concentrating in dyeing techniques and screen printing. Following the completion of her degree in 2003, Mazzolari opened her art studio in Milan while working as Head Designer, specialist in Textiles Jacquards at Verger. Living and working in London since 2014, her multidisciplinary practice involves textile manipulation, printing, painting, photography, video and performance. She is inspired by psychoanalysis, intuition, cognition, human behaviour and emotional development.

FINE CELL WORK is a UK charity which enables prisoners to build fulfilling and crime-free lives by training them to do high-quality, skilled, creative needlework undertaken in the long hours spent in their cells to foster hope, discipline and self-esteem. Currently working in 32 British prisons, and engaging with over 500 prisoners each year, Fine Cell Work addresses key issues affecting prisoners’ offending behaviours: establishing and reinforcing work skills, building relationships and mental resilience.

TRISTAN HOARE represents both emerging and established international contemporary artists, working in a variety of mediums. The gallery hosts a series of events and talks to run alongside each exhibition. Founded in 2009, the gallery was originally based in Notting Hill at Lichfield Studios until 2014. In September 2016, Tristan Hoare opened its new premises at Six Fitzroy Square, a Grade I listed building, designed by the architect Robert Adam. TRISTAN HOARE GALLERY 6 Fitzroy Square London W1T 5HJ Tuesday–Saturday 11am–6pm
info@tristanhoare.co.uk +44 (0) 207 383 4484 http://www.tristanhoare.co.uk @tristanhoare 

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